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Archive for October, 2012

How to authorize Adobe Digital Editions on a computer

Whenever you use a new computer for eBooks from an OverDrive-powered site, you will be prompted to ‘Authorize’ Adobe Digital Editions (ADE). To enjoy eBooks on additional computers or devices, be sure to authorize each one with the same Adobe ID. You may authorize up to 6 devices.

Note: These instructions are for ADE 2.0. Please make sure you’re using the most up-to-date version before continuing.

What you need

  • Adobe Digital Editions installed on your Windows or Mac computer

Authorize your computer

  1. If you aren’t prompted to authorize ADE the first time you open it, you can go to Help > Authorize Computer (if you have not already authorized).

    Screenshot showing the Help menu with authorize computer selected.

  2. If you have an Adobe ID, enter it along with your password.

    Screenshot showing the authorization window for ADE

  3. If you do not have an Adobe ID, click Create an Adobe ID to make one on Adobe’s website.
    Once you’re done, return to the ‘Adobe Digital Editions’ dialog box and enter your Adobe ID and password.
  4. Click Authorize. Your computer is now authorized with your Adobe ID.

Amazon Kindle eBooks lending library launches in the UK

Amazon Kindle TouchAmazon Kindle owners in the UK can now borrow eBooks, including all seven Harry Potter titles, from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, which launches today.
Kindle users can choose from more than 200,000 books to borrow for free. These can be read on Kindle e-ink e-readers and also the Kindle Fire tablet computers.

Amazon has also today announced that its new Kindle Paperwhite, the most advanced e-reader it has ever offered, is coming to Britain this month.

To access the Lending Library, consumers must sign up for an Amazon Prime membership, which costs £49 per year and gives users discounted delivery on products bought from Amazon.

UK Prime members with Kindle devices can now also access thousands of digital books to borrow for free, as frequently as one a month with no due dates.

Alongside JK Rowling‘s Harry Potter books, the library also offers various popular titles across fiction and non-fiction, including Stephen Leather’s The Basement and M.C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series.

There are also thousands of titles available from the Kindle self-publishing platform, including best-sellers such as Love…From Both Sides by Nick Spalding and As if By Magic by Kerry Wilkinson.

“Owning a Kindle is getting even better. Today, we’re announcing that our newest Prime benefit, built just for Kindle, is coming to UK customers: The Kindle Owners’ Lending Library,” said Jeff Bezos, the founder and chief executive of Amazon.com.

“Prime members will have exclusive access to a huge library of books to read on any Kindle device at no additional cost and with no due dates.

“We’re already seeing the programme’s success in the US for both readers and authors – customers are reading more and authors are reaching a whole new audience while making money in a new way – and we’re excited to bring it to customers in the UK.”

Books can be checked out from the library using a customer’s Kindle device, and users can have one book at a time. The titles are also returned with the device and any notes, highlights or bookmarks are automatically saved should the person re-borrow the book.

Alongside the UK, the Lending Library is coming soon to users in France and German.

Amazon has also started UK pre-orders of the Kindle Paperwhite and confirmed that the product will ship to customers on October 25.

Billed as the “most advanced e-reader ever constructed” by Amazon, the Paperwhite offers 62% more pixels and 25% increased contrast than other Kindles, and comes with a patented built-in front light for reading in all lighting conditions.

The Paperwhite offers up to eight weeks of battery life and is priced from £109 for the WiFi version or £169 for the WiFi and 3G model.

As with other 3G Kindle devices, the premium Paperwhite model involves Amazon paying for the 3G connection so that customers can download content anywhere and anytime in more than 80 countries with no annual contracts.

New version of Adobe Digital Editions

Adobe has officially released Digital Editions 2.0, which comes with several improvements and changes.

  • The interface has been completely redesigned to be screen-reader friendly.
  • The software now presents ebooks as a simple tile or list item. The hover-over context menus are gone. To bring up a context menu, right-click on a cover image.
  • Activating compatible ebook readers has improved significantly. Simply plug in an ebook reader, open Adobe Digital Editions (ADE), then drag a library title over to the device. The software automatically registers and authorizes your device with your computer’s Adobe ID.
  • Adobe has updated the the way the software installs.

This is brand-new software, so there may be a few bugs. There’s one inconsistency that you should be aware of: Loan period banners are not always accurate. For example, a brand-new three-week loan may show up as a two-week loan. Loans still expire at the appropriate time. It’s just the banner that is off. OverDrive has notified Adobe of the issue.

Barnes & Noble Nook HD vs. Amazon Kindle Fire HD: Specs Compared

Several weeks after Amazon took the wraps off its Kindle Fire HD lineup, Barnes & Noble did the same this morning with two new HD Nook tablets of its own.

The Nook HD joins the Kindle Fire HD and the Google Nexus 7 in the 7-inch tablet game. But which is best? In our hands on with the Nook HD, PCMag found that it might have “the best screen on a 7-inch tablet to date.” The Nook HD boasts a 1,440-by-900 display compared to the Kindle Fire HD’s 1,280-by-800 screen. But for $199, you get 8GB on the Nook HD and 16GB on the Fire HD. You can bump up to 16GB on the Nook HD for $229 (a 32GB Fire HD is $249).

The Kindle Fire HD is slightly heavier than the Nook HD at 13.9 oz compared to 11.1 oz, but they’re virtually identical in size. Both run a customized version of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich and TI OMAP chips, but the Fire HD sports a 1.2-GHz OMAP 4460 to the Nook HD’s 1.3-GHz OMAP 4470.

Kindle Fire HD vs. Nook HD

Both include Bluetooth and Wi-Fi support; the Nook HD will connect for free in all Barnes & Noble stores. If you’re looking for a camera, the Fire HD has a front-facing one, but you won’t find a camera on the Nook HD.

Content will likely be a major consideration. The Kindle HD taps into the Amazon Appstore and its approximately 50,000 apps. The Nook provides access to Nook Apps, which has about 6,000 apps. The Kindle can also access Amazon’s video services, but B&N announced that it will soon launch Nook Video, which will serve up similar content.